change ceiling fan directionHow can you save money and energy while running your HVAC system and still maintain comfort? There are a number of ways, including making use of ceiling fans. Fans have a reputation for keeping us cool, but did you know you can make use of yours in the winter, too? You just need to change ceiling fan direction.

Ceiling Fans in the Summer

In the summertime, your ceiling fan should spin counterclockwise so air blows down into the room. By running your fan with your HVAC system, you can turn the thermostat up four or five degrees with no reduction in comfort. The wind chill factor keeps your skin feeling cool as the air blows against it, allowing you to get comfortable with less energy.

Wintertime Operation

In the wintertime, you can change ceiling fan direction to clockwise to help distribute heated air. Hot air rises, so your HVAC system spends a good deal of time heating the area above your head before you actually get comfortable. When your ceiling fan runs clockwise, it can create an updraft, bringing the cool air up toward it, and forcing the warm air down without creating a wind chill factor.

The ideal place for a fan in winter is at the top of a staircase, and about 18 inches from the ceiling. The air that’s risen to the very top can flow down to the bottom floor, where it’s needed most.

How to Make the Switch

To change ceiling fan direction, find the switch on the body of the fan. Once you’ve flipped the switch, turn the fan on and stand under it to make sure it’s going the right direction. In the summer, the blades should spin counterclockwise and you should feel a breeze on your skin as you stand underneath the fan. In the winter, change the blades to the clockwise direction. Be sure to turn the fan off before attempting to adjust the settings, in order to avoid injury.

Homeowners who change ceiling fan direction each season can enjoy other energy savings as well with the help of the pros at Wood Air Conditioning, Inc. Contact us today at 903-285-6550 for your home comfort needs.

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