Almost every home has an HVAC system. But many homeowners in Mount Pleasant, Texas, aren’t aware of how to evaluate their system’s performance. Here are three things you should know about your heating and cooling system’s performance so that you can improve it:

Age

On the side of the compressor, you’ll see your HVAC system’s data plate. There, look for the serial number where the age of the compressor is written in coded form.

For example, the serial number might be L010303132. “L” is the twelfth letter of the alphabet, which means the system was manufactured in the 12th month (December). The next two digits are 0 and 1, which means it was manufactured in the year 2001. If your HVAC system is older than 10 years, you should consider replacing it with a newer, more energy-efficient model.

Size

The size of an HVAC system is measured as tonnage. A “ton” in this case is the amount of heat required to melt 2000 lbs. (one ton) of ice in 24 hours. Remember: 12,000 Btu/hr is equal to one ton, 18,000 Btu/hr is equal to 1.5 tons and 24,000 Btu is equal to 2 tons. The data plate also includes information about the tonnage. Of course, good maintenance also affects the capacity of your system.

SEER Rating

The Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) is the ratio of the cooling capacity and power input of the HVAC system. It’s averaged over a full season. If the rating of the HVAC system is higher, it means the system is more efficient. If the rating of the HVAC system is lower, it means the system is less energy efficient. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the SEER rating of an HVAC system should be at least 14.

Equipped with this data, you can make some decisions about whether your HVAC system is in good shape. Age, capacity and SEER rating can give you an idea of what you can reasonably expect in terms of energy efficiency.

But, to test the efficiency of your particular system against these standards, it’s wise to call in a professional for a performance evaluation. We’re happy to help. Give Wood Air Conditioning, Inc. a call at 903-285-6550.

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